Forum Dunmore Strona Główna Dunmore
Dumore Irish Dance Academy
 
 POMOCPOMOC   FAQFAQ   SzukajSzukaj   UżytkownicyUżytkownicy   GrupyGrupy   RejestracjaRejestracja 
 ProfilProfil   Zaloguj się, by sprawdzić wiadomościZaloguj się, by sprawdzić wiadomości   ZalogujZaloguj 

gw2 gold Computer reveals stone tablet 'handwriting' in a fl

 
Napisz nowy temat   Odpowiedz do tematu    Forum Dunmore Strona Główna -> Komunikaty
Zobacz poprzedni temat :: Zobacz następny temat  
Autor Wiadomość
rU0jW6zZ7f
ćwiczę cuty i szpagaty


Dołączył: 28 Kwi 2014
Posty: 17

PostWysłany: Wto Kwi 29, 2014 14:41    Temat postu: gw2 gold Computer reveals stone tablet 'handwriting' in a fl Odpowiedz z cytatem

Computer reveals stone tablet 'handwriting' in a flashYou might call it "CSI Ancient Greece". A computer technique can tell the difference between ancient inscriptions created by different artisans, a feat that ordinarily consumes years of human scholarship. "This is the first time anything like this had been done on a computer," says Stephen Tracy, a Greek scholar and epigrapher at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, who challenged a team of computer scientists to attribute 24 ancient Greek inscriptions to their rightful maker. "They knew nothing about inscriptions," he says. Tracy has spent his career making such attributions, which help scholars attach firmer dates to the tens of thousands of ancient Athenian and Attican stone inscriptions that have been found. "Most inscriptions we find are very fragmentary," Tracy says. "They are very difficult to date and, as is true of all archaeological artefacts, the better the date you can give to an artefact, the more it can tell you." Just as English handwriting morphed from ornate script filled with curvy flourishes to the utilitarian penmanship practiced today, Greek marble inscriptions evolved over the course of the civilisation. [url=http://www.goldvk.com/Game.gw2_us.Guild Wars 2.gw2.Gold.Info.aspx]gw2 gold[/url] "Lettering of the fifth century BC and lettering of the first century BC don't look very much alike, and even a novice can tell them apart," Tracy says. Eye for detail But narrowing inscriptions to a window smaller than 100 years requires a better trained eye, not to mention far more time and effort; Tracy spent 15 years on his first book. [url=http://www.goldvk.com/Game.gw2_us.Guild Wars 2.gw2.Gold.Info.aspx]guild wars 2 gold[/url] "One iota [a letter of the Greek alphabet] is pretty much like another, but I know one inscriber who makes an iota with a small little stroke at the top of the letter. I don't know another cutter who does. That becomes, for him, like a signature," says Tracy, who relies principally on the shape of individual letters to attribute authorship. However, these signatures aren't always apparent even after painstaking analysis, and attributions can vary among scholars, says Michail Panagopoulos , a computer scientist at the National Technical University of Athens, who led the project along with colleague Constantin Papaodysseus . "I could show you two 'A's that look exactly the same, and I can tell you they are form different writers," Panagopoulos says. Average letter Panagopoulos' team determined what different cutters meant each letter to look like by overlaying digital scans of the same letter in each individual inscription. They call this average a letter's "platonic realisation". After performing this calculation for six Greek letters selected for their distinctness – Α, Ρ, Μ, Ν, Ο and Σ – across all 24 inscriptions, Panagopoulos' team compared all the scripts that Tracy provided. The researchers correctly attributed the inscriptions to six different cutters, who worked between 334 BC and 134 BC – a 100-per-cent success rate. "I was both surprised and encouraged," Tracy says of their success. "This is a very difficult problem," agrees Lambert Schomaker , a researcher at University of Groningen, Netherlands, who has developed computational methods to identify the handwriting of mediaeval monks, which is much easier to link to a writer compared with chisel marks on stone. Database plan Although Panagopoulos' team correctly attributed all the inscriptions to their rightful chiseller, Schomaker worries that shadows could distort the digital photographs used in the analysis. Three-dimensional lasers scans of the inscriptions may offer more precision, he says. Panagopoulos says his team is looking to use 3D images in the future. The Greek computer scientists would also like to build a comprehensive database of digital inscriptions and attributions, so any newly discovered or analysed inscription could be quickly attributed and dated. [url=http://www.goldvk.com/Game.gw2_us.Guild Wars 2.gw2.Gold.Info.aspx]gw2 gold[/url] See also: Decoding antiquity: Eight scripts that still can't be read Journal references: Panagopoulos' study – IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (DOI: 10.1109/TPAMI.2008.201); Tracy's report – American Journal of Archaeology (Vol 113 (2009), No 1, p 99-102) xboter 2014
Powrót do góry
Ogląda profil użytkownika Wyślij prywatną wiadomość Wyślij email Odwiedź stronę autora
Reklama






Wysłany: Wto Kwi 29, 2014 14:41    Temat postu:

Powrót do góry
Wyświetl posty z ostatnich:   
Napisz nowy temat   Odpowiedz do tematu    Forum Dunmore Strona Główna -> Komunikaty Wszystkie czasy w strefie CET (Europa)
Strona 1 z 1
Skocz do:  
Nie możesz pisać nowych tematów
Nie możesz odpowiadać w tematach
Nie możesz zmieniać swoich postów
Nie możesz usuwać swoich postów
Nie możesz głosować w ankietach

Dunmore  

To forum działa w systemie phorum.pl
Masz pomysł na forum? Załóż forum za darmo!
Forum narusza regulamin? Powiadom nas o tym!
Powered by Active24, phpBB © phpBB Group